North Korean missile landed in Sea of Japan: Suga

A ballistic missile launched by North Korea flew 30 minutes and landed in the Sea of Japan, Japanese Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said on Sunday.

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South Korea’s military said separately the missile had flown about 700 kilometres (430 miles).

Japanese Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said on Sunday that North Korea’s firing of a ballistic missile was a violation of U.N. resolutions and that Japan strongly protested the action.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe repeated the protest in comments to reporters.

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South Korea’s military said earlier that North Korean had fired an unidentified projectile from a region near its west coast.

North Korea fired on Sunday an unidentified projectile from a region near its west coast, South Korea’s military said.

The nature of the projectile is not immediately clear, a South Korean military official said by telephone.

Yonhap news agency reported the projectile launched appeared to be a ballistic missile.

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Surgery ‘should be option for obese kids’

Weight loss surgery on a child may be the only option in some cases but caution is needed, doctors and experts agree.

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Brisbane-based surgeon Dr George Hopkins says desperate parents of obese children are screaming out for the surgical intervention yet the Australian hospital system is “unequipped” to meet their need.

Speaking at the Australian New Zealand College of Anaesthetist’s Annual Scientific Meeting (ASM) in Brisbane, he implored his colleagues to start a conversation on the controversial issue.

“It’s been discussed intermittently in small groups, but we need more than that for hospitals to start saying ‘lets set this up’. Logistically our health system as it stands can’t deal with this,” he said.

Dr Matthew Remedios, a Brisbane-based gastroenterologist, performing the operation on a child depends on the situation but said the medical profession does need to be careful.

“Next will be lap-sleeving people in utero,” he said during a Q&A session at the ASM on Sunday.

“As a community we should have some degrees of caution and thought before we rush into surgical procedures for overweight minors,” he told AAP.

One in four Australian children aged 2-17 are now either overweight or obese.

Dr Hopkins has been performing effective sleeve gastrectomies on adolescents for years and says his patients have been getting younger.

One was an 11-year-old boy who weighed about 135kg but was unable to have the surgery unlike his 15-year-old brother.

The boy refused to go to school because the playground became too difficult for him psychologically.

“It was not worth it, he could learn nothing in the environment that had been created,” Dr Hopkins told the meeting.

“It was literally gut-wrenching.

“The need out there is just screaming, it’s just a question of getting everybody on board,” he said.

“These parents are often desperate. If someone is dragging their kid along to see me because they care, they’re prepared to go through all the steps to do it. It’s not child abuse, it’s anything but.”

At the end of the day, however, there must be a consensus on how young is too young because there are risks involved with any surgical procedure, he acknowledged.

Dr Hopkins said “conservative management does not work” and to insist that it does is almost “perverse” because obesity can be the result of a genetic predisposition.

“Obviously prevention is always better than the cure, but we don’t stand outside cancer clinics saying, ‘if we just could have prevented it’,” he said.

Dr Hopkins’ comments echo the concerns of childhood obesity expert Professor Louise Baur, of The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, who says the Australian health system is failing people who are struggling with obesity.

Research shows just one in 60 overweight or obese children are offered help in weight management from their doctor and “highly effective” bariatric surgery isn’t easily accessible to those who need it most, she told the 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians Conference.

Giants beat Vixens in Super Netball

Giants coach Julie Fitzgerald believes her side’s ability to pile immediate pressure in high-flying Melbourne Vixens was the catalyst for their polished 56-52 Super Netball win at AIS Arena on Sunday.

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After a lean period, in which it seemed that the absence of injured captain Kim Green might be too much to bear, the Giants strung together a consummate team performance on Sunday.

The win catapults them past the Vixens and Sunshine Coast Lightning to the top of the ladder with just two rounds remaining before the finals.

The Giants won the first quarter by four goals, but the Vixens claimed the second by a goal, leaving the halftime ledger at 28-25 to the home side.

The Giants stepped up the tempo again after the break to open up a seven-goal margin at three-quarter-time.

The Vixens came home strongly in the final term but the Giants held on to secure a confidence-building win.

“We knew if we were going to beat a team like the Vixens we had to be honest for the whole 60 minutes,” Fitzgerald said.

“We couldn’t afford a slow start because they’ve had a couple of really blistering first quarters, so we knew our start had to be good.”

Fitzgerald was thrilled with the Giants’ defensive effort throughout and pleased that her positional changes for Susan Pettitt and Jo Harten paid off.

“I think it was a good option for us to move Susan into goal shooter and Jo to goal attack because it provided us with really good movement in the circle,” Fitzgerald said.

“Jo’s good for us defensively down the court. I thought there were a lot of plusses.”

The Giants’ early six-goal lead condemned Melbourne to an opening-quarter deficit for the first time this season.

The Vixens stepped up their defensive pressure in the second term, but failed to fully convert that improvement at the other end of the court.

The Giants re-asserted their authority in the third period, prompting a Melbourne time out and a change with Emma Ryde at goal shooter in place of Mwai Kumwenda.

Giants goalkeeper Sam Poolman maintained her intensity, seeing her side extend their advantage to eight goals before going to the final break ahead 42-35.

The Vixens found some answers late in the match, but they came too late.

“I don’t think we ever really got into the game,” Vixens coach Simone McKinnis said.

“The Giants did a great job in keeping up their effort right from the word go.

‘They were very good from the first whistle and we spent the game chasing.”

The Giants host the fifth-placed Queensland Firebirds next round, while the Vixens are at home against the rock-bottom Adelaide Thunderbirds.

Vixens unfazed as netball finals beckon

Melbourne Vixens coach Simone McKinnis will not be lured into wholesale personnel changes in the wake of the 56-52 loss to Giants Netball on Sunday, that saw her side relinquish top spot on the Super Netball ladder with just two rounds remaining.

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The Vixens have fielded a remarkably consistent starting seven throughout the season, but they were shut out by a polished Giants outfit, who now lead the competition from the Vixens and Sunshine Coast Lightning.

It puts the Sydney club on track for the minor premiership and a home major semi-final, though the Vixens and Lightning remain only a point behind.

“We really wanted to win that game,” McKinnis admitted of the round 12 loss at AIS Arena in Canberra.

“But the thing is, we’ve got to take what we need to from the game and just move forward. We’ve got two more games and the opportunity is still there to finish on top. That’s what we want.”

Asked if the result would spur a re-think of the starting lining up, McKinnis said: “I don’t think so. We’ve got 10 players that are capable of going on. We didn’t play very well, the Giants played a very good game, you’ve got to identify those areas that we struggled in and address them.

“I definitely have to acknowledge that the Giants played very well and didn’t allow us to get into the game. But that’s a good learning experience for us.”

For the Giants – who have battled hard since losing captain Kim Green to a serious knee injury five weeks into the season – toppling the Vixens was a huge lift after a period of moderate form.

“I won’t pretend, it’s a massive confidence boost,” coach Julie Fitzgerald said.

“Everybody knows we haven’t been at our best for the last few weeks. We’ve been training terribly hard, just trying to find the answers and put it all together. For that result to eventuate after all the hard work these girls have put in, and all the encouragement and support they’ve given each other, is very rewarding.”

The Giants’ win moved them to 20 points, with the Vixens in second ahead of Lightning on percentage. Lightning scored a 64-50 win over West Coast Fever on the Sunshine Coast on Friday night.

Collingwood’s gritty 62-50 triumph over NSW Swifts on Saturday night in Melbourne consolidated the Magpies’ hold on fourth place with a three-point break from the Queensland Firebirds. The Magpies have hit form at the right time, winning four of their past five clashes.

First plays second and third plays fourth in the first round of finals on June 3, with the top-placed side in each game hosting.

Mundy the hero for Dockers in AFL thriller

David Mundy has broken Richmond hearts for the second time in three years, goaling after the siren to give Fremantle a dramatic two-point win in their AFL match at the MCG.

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Dockers coach Ross Lyon nearly missed the dramatic denouement as he had left the box and headed straight for the lift when Brandon Ellis’s flying left-footed snap sailed through at the other end to give the Tigers an unlikely lead with 24 seconds left on the clock.

But crucially, Dockers onballer Lachie Neale was able to win the last centre clearance of the match and get the ball to the ice-cool Mundy, who marked and kicked truly to secure a 10.12 (72) to 10.10 (70) victory.

It was Fremantle’s only goal of the fourth quarter after Richmond had kicked five majors on the trot, having started the term 30 points in arrears.

Two years ago, Mundy kicked the final goal at the MCG in near-identical circumstances against the Tigers after Bachar Houli committed a bad turnover.

“Neale cleared it, somehow found Mundy, I got out of the lift and Mundy was lined up and the siren had gone,” Lyon said.

“I just wasn’t sure how far out or how wide the angle.

“What was it – 30 metres and 45 degrees? I thought ‘he’s done this before David so he’ll probably do it again’.

“But until you see it sail through … to handle that sort of pressure, he’s been wonderful this year.”

Sunday’s win was Fremantle’s fifth in their past six games.

Richmond have now lost three matches on the trot, the last two by less than a goal to the Western Bulldogs and the Dockers.

“I thought our first three quarters were pretty poor, we didn’t play anywhere near what we would have liked, didn’t defend it particularly well,” Richmond coach Damien Hardwick said.

“You look at the last 20 seconds and there were things we could have done better in that situation too.

“But the damage was done in the first thee quarters where we played a pretty poor brand of footy.”

Fremantle had the better of a thoroughly forgettable first half, but led by only five points at the long break after Dustin Martin goaled in the final minute.

The Dockers lifted in the third term, but Richmond got even worse, conceding four goals to nil as the margin blew out.

The Tigers looked to have finally kicked their first goal of the third quarter in the dying seconds, only for Josh Caddy’s effort to be controversially disallowed for a goal-line shepherd by Jack Riewoldt, which was deemed illegal.

Richmond slipped to a 5-3 win-loss record, having started the season with five-straight victories.

The Tigers’ next match is a trip to Spotless Stadium to take on the GWS Giantson Saturday, while Fremantle return home to square off against improving Carlton next Sunday.

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Leaders condemn latest North Korea missile

North Korea has fired a ballistic missile in defiance of calls to rein in its weapons program, South Korean and US officials said, days after a new leader took office in the South, pledging to engage it in dialogue.

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The US Pacific Command said it was assessing the type of missile but it was “not consistent with an intercontinental ballistic missile”.

Japanese Defence Minister Tomomi Inada said the missile could be of a new type.

The missile flew 700 km and reached an altitude of more than 2000 km, according to officials in South Korea and Japan, further and higher than an intermediate-range missile North Korea successfully tested in February from the same region of Kusong, northwest of its capital, Pyongyang.

North Korea is widely believed to be developing an intercontinental missile tipped with a nuclear weapon that is capable of reaching the United States. US President Donald Trump has vowed not to let that happen.

Experts said Sunday’s test showed a considerably longer range than missiles North Korea had previously tested, meaning it had likely made improvements since its February test.

The reported altitude would indicate the missile was launched at a high trajectory.

David Wright, co-director of the UCS Global Security Program and a missile expert, said if the missile had been fired at a standard trajectory, it would have had a maximum range of about 4500 km

Kim Dong-yub, Kyungnam University’s Institute of Far Eastern Studies in Seoul, said he estimated a standard trajectory firing would give it a range of 6000 km, meaning it would be capable of reaching Hawaii.

An intercontinental ballistic missile is considered to have a range of more than 6000 km.

Japan said the missile flew for 30 minutes before dropping into the sea between North Korea’s east coast and Japan. The North has consistently test-fired missiles in that direction.

“If that report … is correct, then the launch may indeed represent a new missile with a long range,” said Jonathan McDowell of the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, referring the estimated altitude of more than 2,000 km.

“It is definitely concerning,” McDowell said.

In Washington, the White House said Trump “cannot imagine Russia is pleased” with the test as the missile landed closer to Russia than to Japan.

“With the missile impacting so close to Russian soil – in fact, closer to Russia than to Japan – the President cannot imagine that Russia is pleased,” it said.

The launch served as a call for all nations to implement stronger sanctions against North Korea, it added.

The launch, at 5.27 am Seoul time on Sunday, came two weeks after North Korea fired a missile that disintegrated minutes into flight, marking its fourth consecutive failure since March.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in, who took office on Wednesday, held his first National Security Council in response to the launch, which he called a “clear violation” of UN Security Council resolutions, his office said.

“The president said while South Korea remains open to the possibility of dialogue with North Korea, it is only possible when the North shows a change in attitude,” Yoon Young-chan, Moon’s press secretary, told a briefing.

Moon won Tuesday’s election on a platform of a moderate approach to North Korea and has said he would be willing to go to Pyongyang under the right circumstances, arguing dialogue must be used in parallel with sanctions.

China, the North’s sole main ally which nevertheless objects to its weapons programs, called for restraint and for no one to exacerbate tension.

Giants beat Vixens in Super Netball

Giants coach Julie Fitzgerald believes her side’s ability to pile immediate pressure in high-flying Melbourne Vixens was the catalyst for their polished 56-52 Super Netball win at AIS Arena on Sunday.

长沙夜网

After a lean period, in which it seemed that the absence of injured captain Kim Green might be too much to bear, the Giants strung together a consummate team performance on Sunday.

The win catapults them past the Vixens and Sunshine Coast Lightning to the top of the ladder with just two rounds remaining before the finals.

The Giants won the first quarter by four goals, but the Vixens claimed the second by a goal, leaving the halftime ledger at 28-25 to the home side.

The Giants stepped up the tempo again after the break to open up a seven-goal margin at three-quarter-time.

The Vixens came home strongly in the final term but the Giants held on to secure a confidence-building win.

“We knew if we were going to beat a team like the Vixens we had to be honest for the whole 60 minutes,” Fitzgerald said.

“We couldn’t afford a slow start because they’ve had a couple of really blistering first quarters, so we knew our start had to be good.”

Fitzgerald was thrilled with the Giants’ defensive effort throughout and pleased that her positional changes for Susan Pettitt and Jo Harten paid off.

“I think it was a good option for us to move Susan into goal shooter and Jo to goal attack because it provided us with really good movement in the circle,” Fitzgerald said.

“Jo’s good for us defensively down the court. I thought there were a lot of plusses.”

The Giants’ early six-goal lead condemned Melbourne to an opening-quarter deficit for the first time this season.

The Vixens stepped up their defensive pressure in the second term, but failed to fully convert that improvement at the other end of the court.

The Giants re-asserted their authority in the third period, prompting a Melbourne time out and a change with Emma Ryde at goal shooter in place of Mwai Kumwenda.

Giants goalkeeper Sam Poolman maintained her intensity, seeing her side extend their advantage to eight goals before going to the final break ahead 42-35.

The Vixens found some answers late in the match, but they came too late.

“I don’t think we ever really got into the game,” Vixens coach Simone McKinnis said.

“The Giants did a great job in keeping up their effort right from the word go.

‘They were very good from the first whistle and we spent the game chasing.”

The Giants host the fifth-placed Queensland Firebirds next round, while the Vixens are at home against the rock-bottom Adelaide Thunderbirds.

Global hunt for perpetrators of ‘unprecedented’ cyberattack

International investigators are continuing the search for those behind an unprecedented cyberattack that affected systems in dozens of countries, including banks, hospitals and government agencies, as security experts sought to contain the fallout.

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The assault, which began Friday and was being described as the biggest-ever cyber ransom attack, struck state agencies and major companies around the world – from Russian banks and British hospitals to FedEx and European car factories.

“The recent attack is at an unprecedented level and will require a complex international investigation to identify the culprits,” said Europol, Europe’s police agency.

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Europol said a special task force at its European Cybercrime Centre was “specially designed to assist in such investigations and will play an important role in supporting the investigation”.

The attacks used ransomware that apparently exploited a security flaw in Microsoft operating systems, locking users’ files unless they pay the attackers a designated sum in the virtual currency Bitcoin.

Images appeared on victims’ screens demanding payment of $300 (275 euros) in Bitcoin, saying: “Ooops, your files have been encrypted!”

Payment is demanded within three days or the price is doubled, and if none is received within seven days the files will be deleted, according to the screen message.

Watch: Ciaran Martin on global cyberattack 

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But experts and government alike warn against ceding to the hackers’ demands.

“Paying the ransom does not guarantee the encrypted files will be released,” the US Department of Homeland Security’s computer emergency response team said.

“It only guarantees that the malicious actors receive the victim’s money, and in some cases, their banking information.”

‘Painful’

Experts and officials offered differing estimates of the scope of the attacks, but all agreed it was huge.

Mikko Hypponen, chief research officer at the Helsinki-based cyber security company F-Secure, told AFP it was the biggest ransomware outbreak in history, saying that 130,000 systems in more than 100 countries had been affected.

He said Russia and India were hit particularly hard, largely because Microsoft’s Windows XP – one of the operating systems most at risk – was still widely used there.

French police said there were “more than 75,000 victims” around the globe, but cautioned that the number could increase “significantly”. 

Watch: Cyberattacks wreak havoc worldwide

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The virus spread quickly because the culprits used a digital code believed to have been developed by the US National Security Agency – and subsequently leaked as part of a document dump, according to researchers at the Moscow-based computer security firm Kaspersky Lab.

Microsoft said the situation was “painful” and that it was taking “all possible actions to protect our customers”.

It issued guidance for people to protect their systems, while taking the highly unusual step of reissuing security patches first made available in March for Windows XP and other older versions of its operating system.

Europe worst hit

US software firm Symantec said the majority of organisations affected were in Europe, and the attack was believed to be indiscriminate.

The companies and government agencies targeted were diverse.

In the United States, package delivery group FedEx said it was “implementing remediation steps as quickly as possible,” while French carmaker Renault was forced to stop production at sites in France, Slovenia and Romania.

Russia’s interior ministry said some of its computers had been hit by a “virus attack” and that efforts were underway to destroy it. The country’s banking system was also attacked, although no problems were detected, as was the railway system.

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Germany’s rail operator Deutsche Bahn said its station display panels were affected. Universities in Greece and Italy also were hit.

China’s network information safety working group sent a warning to universities about the cyber-attack and the National Internet Emergency Center suggested that users update Windows security patches.

Shanghai’s Fudan University received reports that a large number of school computers were infected with the virus.

Accidental ‘kill switch’

Kaspersky said it was “trying to determine whether it is possible to decrypt data locked in the attack – with the aim of developing a decryption tool as soon as possible.”

On Saturday, a cyber security researcher told AFP he had accidentally discovered a “kill switch” that could prevent the spread of the ransomware.

The researcher, tweeting as @MalwareTechBlog, said registering a domain name used by the malware stops it from spreading, though it cannot help computers already affected.

“If you have anything to patch, patch it,” the researcher said in a blog post. “Now I should probably sleep.”

A hacking group called Shadow Brokers released the malware in April claiming to have discovered the flaw from the NSA, Kaspersky said.

“Unlike most other attacks, this malware is spreading primarily by direct infection from machine to machine on local networks, rather than purely by email,” said Lance Cottrell, chief scientist at the US technology group Ntrepid.

G7 finance ministers meeting in Italy vowed to unite against cyber crime, as it represented a growing threat to their economies and should be tackled as a priority. The danger will be discussed at the G7 leaders’ summit next month.

In Britain, the attack disrupted care at National Health Service facilities, forcing ambulances to divert and hospitals to postpone operations.

“There will be lessons to learn from what appears to be the biggest criminal cyber-attack in history,” Interior minister Amber Rudd said.

“But our immediate priority as a government is to disrupt the attack, restore affected services as soon as possible, and establish who was behind it so we can bring them to justice.”

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